PODCAST: An Interview with Bruce Pennay — The Role of the Border Region in Our National Story

Posted on November 10, 2010 by


Bruce Pennay

On this podcast, Our Voice: Politics Albury-Wodonga is privileged to talk local history with Professor Bruce Pennay OAM.  Bruce Pennay is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Environmental Sciences at Charles Sturt University, Thurgoona Campus.  In a fascinating discussion, Bruce takes us back in time to examine some key periods of local history with great significance to the story of Australia: the gold rush, federation, and the post-World War II migrant influx—in which we touch on migration in the border region, antagonistic water and railway politics dating back to the 19th century, and much more.  So sit back and enjoy this intriguing journey into the rich history of Albury-Wodonga and the border region.

DOWNLOAD: Interview with Bruce Pennay

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Bruce Pennay is an honorary Adjunct Associate Professor of Charles Sturt University.  Bruce is a practising heritage and historian consultant, specialising in regional New South Wales and Victorian studies. He has worked as the historian on the heritage studies of Wodonga City, Indigo Shire, Deniliquin Council, Murray Shire, Goulburn City and Albury City. He has published histories about Wollongong, Bathurst, Broken Hill and Albury.  His most recent work focuses on the wartime history of Albury and the Bonegilla migrant centre.  Bruce has received several awards for his services to the border region: In 2009 he was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in the General Division; Life member of the History Council of Australia; Fellowship of the Federation of Australian Historical Societies; History Council of New South Wales Annual History Citation Centenary Medal.

Website: http://www.csu.edu.au/research/ilws/about/members/pennay.htm

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The views in this story are those of the author and not necessarily those of Our Voice: Politics Albury-Wodonga.

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