Browsing All Posts filed under »Federal Politics«

EVENT REVIEW: La Trobe University — Wodonga Senior Secondary College Refugee Workshop

May 16, 2012 by

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BY BEN HABIB. On Friday 11th May 2012, year 10 students from Wodonga Senior Secondary College participated in workshops at La Trobe University Albury-Wodonga campus and excursions to the Bonegilla Migrant Experience as a component of thier studies into refugees and asylum seekers. The introductory remarks of the expert panelists and the panel discussion itself are available here for download.

Observations on My Role in Commenting on the New Albury Anti-Carbon Tax Group

March 21, 2012 by

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BY BEN HABIB. Last Saturday I provided comment in an article in the Border Mail—‘Doug takes up fight on carbon tax’—about a new group called Border Says NO to Carbon Tax being established by local trucking operator Doug McMillan. No-one wants to see hard working local businessmen like Doug McMillan lose their livelihoods. If people with climate-related expertise can work cooperatively with local businesses and other impacted members of the community, we can constructively adapt to the many challenges posed by climate change instead of further fracturing the community for the sake of argument. However for the cooperative approach to work, everyone has to begin from a position of informed empowerment.

The ALP Leadership Circus Rolls On: Gillard’s Bold Appointment of Bob Carr as Foreign Minister

March 5, 2012 by

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BY BEN HABIB. The appointment of former New South Wales Premier and newly minted Federal senator Bob Carr as foreign minister is a bold statement of Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s intent to vanquish the prowling wolves within her own ranks.

ALP Leadership Contest, Factional Divisions and the Spectre of International Crises

February 24, 2012 by

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BY BEN HABIB. The current Gillard-Rudd confrontation highlights the problems that Australia’s 20th century political parties face in dealing with 21st century policy problems. The Gillard-Rudd rivalry is a story of ambition, bitterness and betrayal. Yet there is a broader dimension to the ALP leadership crisis that is more complicated.

EVENT NOTICEBOARD: ‘The Basin Plan – Who Needs It?’ @ La Trobe University Albury-Wodonga

July 20, 2011 by

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The 2011 Jonathan Mann Lecture will differ from previous events delivered by individual speakers by adopting a ‘Community Conversation’ format, facilitating the involvement of key experts, stakeholders and audience members in a serious consideration of the central issues associated with water resource management within the Murray-Darling Basin. The conversation will be moderated by eminent journalist, Kerry O’Brien.

Initial Analysis of the Gillard government’s ‘Clean Energy Future’ Proposal

July 11, 2011 by

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BY BEN HABIB. On Sunday 10th July, 2011, the Gillard government announced the details of its long-awaited carbon tax—the Clean Energy Future scheme. The hype surrounding the announcement was justified; for a number of reasons, this was one of the most important public policy announcements since Federation. I have a cautiously favourable view of the scheme, based on clear scientific evidence about the seriousness of the climate change threat and expert analysis indicating that a market-based carbon price is the cheapest and easiest way to achieve comprehensive nation-wide greenhouse gas emission reduction.

YOUTH VOICE: Considering the Proportional Representation Voting System

June 28, 2011 by

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BY RENAE SHILG. 'Proportional Representation' is a fairer and more representative form of electoral system than the preferential system that our House of Representatives currently employs. However, caution must be taken to ensure a government that can, as well as being as representative as possible, perform its duties effectively. Otherwise, no matter how widely representative it was it couldn't be considered a 'good' government.