Browsing All Posts filed under »Ian Longfield«

YOUR SAY: Four Corners expose the dirty little secret on Coal Seam Gas

February 22, 2011 by

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BY IAN LONGFIELD. I’m not sure how many of you saw the Four Corners story last night (hat tip to Karen for alerting us to it), but it opens up the real story on coal seam gas and it’s cousin, shale or tight gas extraction. The damage to agricultural land as well as the poisoning of wells and the Great Artesian Basin by this process is deplorable. Unfortunately we have both state and Federal governments who are dependent on the royalties and taxes generated, so turn a blind eye or neglect the regulation of these industries to save a few bucks.

PODCAST: Transitions Towns and the Post-Carbon Future of Albury-Wodonga — An Interview with Ian Longfield

October 28, 2010 by

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In this edition of the Our Voice: Politics Albury-Wodonga podcast we’re joined by Ian Longfield from Transition Towns Albury-Wodonga. Ian has campaigned on peak oil issues since 2007 after becoming aware of the problems of energy descent during a 2005 land planning seminar. It was through his professional involvement in property development and agency that he became increasingly concerned at our unsustainable pattern of urban development, incompatible with a future dominated by peak oil and climate change. Our interview discussion ranges from geopolitics to individual action and everywhere in between, so buckle up and enjoy this engrossing conversation.

YOUR SAY: Oil, Blood and Money

October 21, 2010 by

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BY IAN LONGFIELD. The Association for the Study of Peak Oil and Gas (ASPO) have just wrapped up their annual US conference with the general consensus emerging that 2005 marked world peak oil production and is unlikely to be beaten. While the decline slope in oil production may be shallow at the moment, it is likely to accelerate in the coming decade, causing massive disruption to the world economy and shifting the balance of geo-political power.