Browsing All posts tagged under »Political Spin«

Observations on My Role in Commenting on the New Albury Anti-Carbon Tax Group

March 21, 2012 by

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BY BEN HABIB. Last Saturday I provided comment in an article in the Border Mail—‘Doug takes up fight on carbon tax’—about a new group called Border Says NO to Carbon Tax being established by local trucking operator Doug McMillan. No-one wants to see hard working local businessmen like Doug McMillan lose their livelihoods. If people with climate-related expertise can work cooperatively with local businesses and other impacted members of the community, we can constructively adapt to the many challenges posed by climate change instead of further fracturing the community for the sake of argument. However for the cooperative approach to work, everyone has to begin from a position of informed empowerment.

YOUTH VOICE: An Uncertain Future

June 15, 2011 by

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BY MARTIN DICKENS. As a citizen of Generation Y, the current Australian political landscape does little to instil a sense of inner hope for a prosperous and sustainable future. For the youth of today, there is no greater concern in the realm of politics other than the looming threat posed by climate change. It is Generation Y’s discontent with the current political system which signifies a growing challenge to the Australian political landscape and the residing members of parliament should be prepared for this.

WEEKLY DISPATCH: The Media as a Venue for Political Contest

May 15, 2011 by

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BY BEN HABIB. The media is usually the main public forum for political discourse. At its best, the media provides a venue for all sides of a debate to make their case, yet this does not always occur. At its worst, the media is openly biased toward one side of a debate, or narrows the focus of a debate to the exclusion of other mitigating factors, or even disseminates outright untruths. In short, the media is a venue for the contest of power and ideas. In short, the media is a venue for the contest of power and ideas.

EVENT REVIEW: When Q&A Came to Albury-Wodonga

May 5, 2011 by

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BY BEN HABIB, with MARTIN DICKENS, LISA TUCK, LEA MACLAUGHLIN, KRYSTLE BROWN, JESSICA LOVE & ALICIA PETERS. Like everyone else in attendance, I was caught up in the excitement of being part of the spectacle of a live television broadcast. Over 700 people attended the show, the largest ever audience for Q&A. While prepping the audience before the show, Tony Jones described Q&A as an “open democracy experiment” that was “rare in the world”. Or was it?

Eye on the Media: We don’t like change, but it’s coming anyway

May 2, 2011 by

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Australia's political discourse is becoming ever more infantile at the very time when global problems make an informed and politically savvy citizenry all the more important...

Eye on the Media: A Pause for Self-Reflection

April 18, 2011 by

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Interesting recent articles and reports that shine a light on the public consciousness.

WEEKLY DISPATCH: The Carbon Pricing Debate — A Battle for Australia’s Soul

March 9, 2011 by

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BY BEN HABIB. In the past fortnight, Australian political discourse has been dominated by the debate over the pricing of carbon. The Prime Minister’s announcement of a draft carbon pricing policy with the Greens and the independent members has sparked off a vicious volley of hyperbole from those who would object to carbon pricing. The electorate has vacillated somewhere between cautious and hostile on the policy announcement. The ALP has not helped its cause with four years in government characterised by inaction, hot air and spin. We sit now poised at the beginning of a debate over a great systemic reform that will shape our nation for years to come. In many ways, this debate is a battle for Australia’s soul.